FAT IS A FEMINIST ISSUE ORBACH PDF

Fat Is a Feminist Issue [Susie Orbach] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. In one volume together with its bestselling sequel When it was first. Published 40 years ago, psychotherapist Susie Orbach’s Fat Is a Feminist Issue remains a cult classic for its penetrating insights into the cultural obsession. Susie Orbach (born 6 November ) is a British psychotherapist, psychoanalyst, writer and social critic. Her first book, Fat is a Feminist Issue, analysed the.

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A quick reminder … Fat is a Feminist Issue

Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. When it was first published, Fat Is A Feminist Issue became an instant classic and it is as relevant today as it was then. Reflecting on our increasingly diet and body-obsessed society, Susie Orbach’s new introduction explains how generations of women and girls are growing up absorbing the eating anxieties around them.

In an age where women want to be sexy, nurturing, dome When it was first published, Fat Is A Feminist Issue became an instant classic and it is as relevant today as it was then. In an age where women want to be sexy, nurturing, domestic goddesses, confident at work, and feminine too, the twenty-first-century woman is poorly armed for survival. It is a response to our social situation; the way we are seen by others and ourselves. Too often food is a source of anguish, as are our bodies.

But Fat Is A Feminist Issue discusses how we can turn food into a friend and find ways to accept ourselves for who and how we are. Following the step-by-step guide, and you too can put an end to food anxieties and dieting. Paperbackpages. Published January 5th by Arrow first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Fat Is a Feminist Issueplease sign up. Would this book be difficult or triggering to read while coping with eating disorder recovery?

I can’t decide whether reading this book would be good to help me frame my body image in a feminist view or if it would still be too triggering at this point in recovery.

Can’t believe your question has been sitting here for seven months without an answer! I think the answer, unfortunately, is “it depends on who you …more Hi!

I think the answer, unfortunately, is “it depends on who you are and your personal journey and unique perspective”.

I read this book while I was trying to recover from my eating disorder and I found some parts really enjoyable, but other parts made me angry. I remember thinking, “you don’t get ED’s at all! I also orbch didn’t like ix premise in the book that women start out slender and then put on weight to cope with various issues I can’t remember if Orbach explicitly says “because of the patriarchy” but it was something along those lines.

That made me angry because I was trying to reject the idea of thinness as a goal. I’d also strongly recommend having a trusted person to talk to about the content in the book if the content is at all triggering for you.

Susie Orbach – Wikipedia

Ultimately, Orbach’s views are her personal views informed by clinical practice and embedded within a feminist and orbxch perspective. Her views may resonate with you or they may not. I hope this helps and all the best with your eating disorder recovery journey.

See 1 question about Fat Is a Feminist Issue…. Lists with This Book. Jan 14, Diana rated it did not like it Shelves: I have tried reading this several times.

It’s not a diet book–it’s an ANTI-diet book! Because it doesn’t tell you to diet, see! I also say that I don’t need to waste my time and energy on trying to read this anymore.

I don’t care how “groundbreaking” it was supposed to be. Sep 13, Alexandra rated it liked it. Occasionally you pick up and book and it turns out not to be what you expected. The edition of FIFI that I read actually included a second volume and introductions from and back, so I assume it’s one of the most recent editions.

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I expected FIFI to be largely academic discourse on fat and feminism, and was surprised by how much it was an overeating self-help book. I wasn’t sure I fully appreciated that. Don’t femimist me wrong, as an overeater I think much of the analysis of overeating rings utter Occasionally you pick up and book and it turns out not to be what you expected. Don’t get me wrong, as an overeater I think much of the analysis of overeating rings utterly true with my experience, and obviously in her long history of psychotherapy practice Susie Orbach already knows this.

But I did have a problem with some of the approach and terminology. Particularly in the first book I found myself thinking there was plenty of encouragement to set up self-help groups, but little guidance. This is remedied in the practical orbxch, but it still feels quite vague. Perhaps fxt is because a group like this should have a qualified leader.

So many of the examples given were great, and very positive, but in real life it just seems so unlikely that a random group can keep everyone on the journey and always been practical and supportive. I’m not a mental health professional, but I do think that there is a real skill needed to drive group therapy and ensure it’s always positive and action-orientated rather than providing an outlet for discussing issues and then just fixating on them.

Forty years since Fat Is A Feminist Issue | Society | The Guardian

I thought there was a danger following this particularly if you do it on your own that all that will happen is that you’ll orbacj your fears surrounding fat, and then stop there. The other problem I had was the feeling that it was about ‘losing the weight’.

This phrase – and how much do I hate ‘the weight’ as a phrase? As if it’s a separate and specific entity – appears repeatedly and it’s almost as if Orbach is guaranteeing that if you free yourself of your overeating demons, you’ll just be the thin self you’ve been afraid of. But that’s simply feminust true.

You might lose weight. You might live a healthier lifestyle. Self-acceptance is eventually addressed as a key part of making the programme work, but only after frequent reinforcement about people who lost ‘the’ damn weight. Now obviously the book is about fat and about why iseue might make ourselves fat, but for some people overeating is only part of why they are the isuse they are, and they might be healthier, happier and more confident without losing a pound.

Really, I’m glad I read this after Linda Bacon’s Health at Every Size, which basically has the same advice learn to listen to your body’s signals and develop a healthy relationship with food again but from the femiinist of NOT thinking about weight and weight loss, which might end up being the outcome and might not.

I appreciate fay FIFI is about not being afraid to be without a shell of fat, but it too involves accepting the fat – this is much easier to do if you’re not thinking ‘well, for the time being, anyway’. Certainly the psychology of FIFI is honest and interesting, and a worthwhile read for anyone with body issues; I do subscribe to the idea that it’s women’s subordinate role in society that has lead to so many more body issues for them. That’s another thing altogether. While I gave this feminit four stars Fsminist say that with rather significant hesitation: This book in the original publication format struck me as largely irrelevant to women of my generation Y.

The central thesis of this book is that women are fat as a result of institutionalized patriarchy. Women unconsciously make themselves fat for a variety of reasons including, but not limited to, to protect themselves from sexuality, to provide a buffer between their bodies and society, to feel they can While I gave this book four stars I say that with rather significant hesitation: Women unconsciously make themselves fat for a variety of reasons including, but not limited to, to protect themselves from sexuality, to provide a buffer between their bodies and society, to feel they can succeed in business because they are less objectified.

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Much of the blame for this behavior is put on the shoulders of mothers who train us, their daughters, to expect less caring, less love, less support, less everything because it is “the lot of a woman. Woman are still fat today, in More and more women are fat.

Yet our mothers were not slaves to our fathers. Our mothers grew up in the post-WWII era and thus grew up in a time of relative plenty, they grew up in an era of encouraged female post-secondary education, they grew up in a generation where marriage was not necessary, where divorce was not uncommon, and where women were welcome in the workplace. I do wonder how Orbach would address these issues in today’s society, where women like me were raised by feminist single mothers with doctoral degrees, women who always believed they deserved to take up as much or little space as they did, women who encouraged us to be both gentle and loving as well as fierce competitors for jobs, for success, and for ourselves.

View all 4 comments. Jul 26, Yuliya Yurchuk rated it really liked it. Jul 07, Sam rated it it was ok Shelves: I picked this up thinking that this would look at the relationships between food and dieting and the use of these to control women’s bodies and fst, a concept that has been touched upon in some of the other literature I’ve read. But it wasn’t really that. This does start out looking at this but then it shifts focus to the reasons behind compulsive eating and how to break these habits.

The advice and exercises are interesting but I did feel that there was a lot of focus on being slim and some q I picked this up thinking that this would look at the relationships between food and dieting and the use of these to control women’s bodies and lives, a concept that has been touched upon in some of the other literature I’ve read. The advice and exercises are interesting but I did feel that there dat a lot of focus on being slim and some quite substantial assumptions that in controlling compulsive eating everyone can be slim.

I kind of expected more of a focus on acceptance of body size and shape and listening to its needs rather than slim-ness being the end goal. Nov 18, bronberry rated it it was ok. This book was one of the first to talk about women’s relationship with fat. There are some parts that are absolutely spot-on with regards to women’s relationship with food, dieting, their own bodies and the bodies of other people.

I found myself nodding energetically in agreement with these parts of the book. The psychoanalytic interpretation of fat is appealing because it is intuitive but I believe that this interpretation la This book was one of the first to talk about women’s relationship with fat.

The psychoanalytic interpretation of fat is appealing because it is intuitive but I believe that this interpretation lacks an empirical basis. I also disagree with the assumption from the author that all women start out thin and then became fat. This is not the case for many women.

Weight is irrelevant to the primary problem. The book starts off on the right track but is fundamentally flawed in many of its philosophies. Mar 26, Charley Cook rated it it was ok. This is a hard book to rate because it’s so specific to opening a support group and i have no interest in that. I did enjoy the analytical aspect of the first half of the book but yeah.